Beowulf Badge:
A. I feel like Beowulf, as a character, is more complicated than people give him credit for. Most people see him as a one-dimensional hero, but I think he is more than that. He has hubris, or a "fatal flaw" and that is his belief, though never rightly said, that he is invincible. He may be incredibly strong and capable of many heroic deeds, but in the end, he is like all of his men - he is mortal. He may be godly, but he is not actually a god. And one could even go so far as to describe him as being arrogant, though are you really arrogant if what you say is exactly what you can do? The other flaw in Beowulf is that, though he was forced into the role of King of the Geats, he valued valor and prowess in battle over being a good king and doing his job by staying away from the fight, and because of this, he plunged, once again, headfirst into danger, uncaring of the consequence. Not to mention the fact that he was much older than he was when he fought Grendel and Grendel's butt-ugly mother, and therefore death was a much more likely scenario for the end - for both the dragon's death and Beowulf.

B.
Beowulf Image #1: In this image, Beowulf is depicted as a stoic, grave figure, noble and honorable but not engaged in a battle, bloody or otherwise. This painting is a refreshing take on most images of Beowulf; it shows a more solemn side of him, almost as if it is a picture of him at the height of his life, commemorated in a painting for everyone to see, in his honor.

beowulf 1.jpg
Beowulf Image #1: In this image, Beowulf is depicted as a stoic, grave figure, noble and honorable but not engaged in a battle, bloody or otherwise. This painting is a refreshing take on most images of Beowulf; it shows a more solemn side of him, almost as if it is a picture of him at the height of his life, commemorated in a painting for everyone to see, in his honor.


Beowulf Image #2: This image seems more akin to the Beowulf graphic novel, where Beowulf is depicted in a scene in an act of violence. Not a depiction of Beowulf's violence, but of what he is capable of. I'm not entirely sure whether he is holding Grendel's head or Grendel's mother, but I'm going to take an educated guess that it's Grendel's mother's head, since Grendel himself was defeated by having his arm violently ripped from its socket. Difficult to achieve, but obviously effective.

beowulf 2.jpg

Beowulf Image #3: This image is one I find particularly interesting, not because of Beowulf himself, but because of what is around him. As we all know, Zeus is the king of the Greek gods, and he had the ability to harness lightning. Now obviously Greek culture and the culture of the Geats/Danes/etc. are vastly different, but I still feel like lightning is, and has always been, for the most part, a symbol of power, of strength. It is entirely possible this was not the artist's intention, but what I'm getting from here is that Beowulf is on his ship, sailing in to find Hrothgar and offer his assistance, and the skies themselves are praising his arrival. Probably weird, but it's open to interpretation, right?

beowulf 3.jpg

C. Link to my How to Be Beowulf SnapGuide:
https://snapguide.com/guides/be-beowulf-65/


Pilgrim Badge:

A. Chaucer seems to be very cynical in most of his descriptions of the pilgrims. And one thing that stands out to me the most is that one of the sins he capitalizes the most on is greed. Gluttony is a close second, the lust. But never envy or wrath or any of the others. For him, it seems like being dirt poor is synonymous with being a good person. All of the people who had money - or said they had money (cough, cough, I'm looking at you, merchant) - were generally terrible people, or at least had some sort of flaw. But for pilgrims like the parson? Oh, they're fantastic people, the best, but they don't have any money, barely have any material possessions. Makes you wonder why Chaucer himself has such a cynical, seemingly bitter, view of people with money. This is especially curious to me because I looked up his biography, and as he was born into an affluent family, of the bourgeois class, it makes no sense why he'd be so bitter - and drive said bitterness into his story - if he came from money. Also, one last observation - the man must really like his wine, because pretty much all of his characters did, too.

B. See Padlet.

C. Now, to get sappy, I'm going to get kind of personal here. To start, you're going to need backstory, but before I provide you with that backstory, I'll tell you the location of my pilgrimage. The future - an alternative one. So ready for the backstory? Here goes.

I had a cousin, once upon a time. She died when I was thirteen, six years ago. Her name was Avalanna Routh, and she died at age six of AT/RT brain cancer. AT/RT brain cancer is incurable, at least so far as things stand now. When she was diagnosed at six months old (they found a tumor on the back of her head, and that sparked the investigation) the doctors told my aunt and uncle she wouldn't make it to one. But the years passed, and my entire family though this was it, that she was the first one to beat this horrible disease, that she would be okay. Because any human, when faced with the unthinkable, wants to believe the impossible. It's an easier truth to face than the death of someone so young. But a couple months after her sixth birthday, her health got even worse. She could barely stay awake anymore, the chemo was no longer helping, and everyone knew, not least her own mom and dad, that she wasn't long for the world. These words are...painful, to say the least. Av's death is something that I spend my every day trying not to think about. She was so young, and there was no reason, not a one, that she should have died so young. Not a single reason.

So as for why I chose an alternative future as my pilgrimage, I'm sure you can probably figure it out. It's because I would love to go to a world where she was not only still alive, but where she was able to experience the same things I experience every day, for her. Like getting through the painful years of middle school, going on a first date, getting her driver's license, graduating high school, etc. - all things that by right she should have been able to experience but was never able to. To me, that's the only pilgrimage worth undergoing.

Green Knight Badge:

A. I feel like the Green Knight is the ultimate satirical villain. I mean, here is an immortal/supernatural being that challenges an entire court of warriors to a duel, gets his head chopped off, and then calmly gallops off into the night like it's just another day. Although for him, if he does this thing kind of often, it probably is just another day. The Green Knight has his own code of honor, but it's a code of honor that's adjusted to suit someone like him, and probably wouldn't seem all that moral to anyone human. Also, I have to ask this - what is his fascination with the color green? Is it to make others green with envy? I'm sorry, that was terrible.

B. Image #1:

Battleaxe.jpg